Looking for input on a survey to identify root causes for turnover

Hi, we are a small manufacturing company in Wisconsin.  Our current turnover for 2018 is 152%  - yikes!  The production floor is light assembly work.  I've started to create a survey for previous employees to understand the root cause of why they disappeared.  Since the primary languages are Hmong (a Chinese dialect), Spanish, and English.

I'm creating a scantron survey in each language.  I know wages are a topic but I'm not convinced its the turnover driver.  The following is a list of topics/questions that I'm working on.  Please suggest other questions or ideas.  Thanks in advance.  Carrie

 

Leadership

   

 

 

1.  My Supv was available to answer questions

 

 

2.  My Supv would check on me to see how I was doing?

 

 

3.  Everyone was treated the same

 

     

 

Location

1.  Location is too far to drive

 

 

2.  public transportation

 

     

 

Job

1.  Machines were outdated?

 

 

2.  Didn’t have the right equipment to do my job?

 

 

3.  cross train

 

 

4.  Would you recommend our company to a friend or relative

 

5.  Understand the job you were performing

 

 

6.  Ability to take on new tasks

 

 

7.  Sufficient training

 

 

8.  opportunity to grow

 

     

 

Benefits

1.  Time off Benefits

 

 

2.  Bonus program

 

 

3.  Attendance incentives

 

 

4.  Attendance point system

 

 

5.  pay

 

 

     

 

     

 

Environment

1.  temperature

 

 

2.  ability to rotate jobs

 

 

3.  Coworkers

 

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  • Good Morning Carrie!  

    I attached a couple documents for you to review while on your fact finding mission!

    Also, with such a large turnover, and using our partners as a soundboard, we know that benefits package is key to attraction and retention.  I noticed under your Benefits section there was no mention of your health, dental, vision, telemedicine, and disability benefits.  (If you need some specific questions to add, let me know as we are constantly helping our partners engage with their employees to make the workplace more attractive).

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  • Hi Carrie! You've got a pretty good list! I've worked in the manufacturing setting myself and here are a few other ideas (that might already fit in with what you have, but thought I'd add): Flexibility: did the schedule fit their needs? I would see turnover simply because of transportation, school, or parenting. By working with employees on flexibility, we saw a decrease in turnover. Training experience: did someone show you where to go, what to do, how to do it, did you get a realistic job preview prior to starting? (was it what you expected)? Manager: Were they approachable? Greetings: Did you feel welcomed to the company? Did someone show where to go? Did you get to meet anyone you liked? Safety: were they properly trained, felt safe, understood who to talk to if that wasn't the case? If the building isn't temperature controlled, are there mechanisms in place to help those adjust? There's a lot to cover but let me know if you have questions! Also, if you're ever thinking of streamlining/automating your process, please reach out, as my company can help!

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  • Hi, Carrie. I would suggest a different approach - talk to the people who are currently working. It is very difficult to get former employees to take the time to provide feedback after they leave and this helps you focus on those who you still have an opportunity to impact. An employee engagement survey would be an anonymous approach, a skip level meeting with the GM talking directly to the employees (no supervisors present) or just walk around and talk to people. What is the current buzz about people leaving?  What makes you happy at work? What can we do to improve?  Create action items with the leadership team based upon the survey and feedback, communicate back to the group, then implement the action  items.

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